We’re Hungry for Justice: Fast Food Rights National Organising Day: 16 SEP

See Facebook event page here  and for background info on the global fast food rights movement, see #FastFoodGlobal

BFAWU fast food worker members led the charge for £10 an hour and union rights on 15 April global day of action

BFAWU fast food worker members led the charge for £10 an hour and union rights on 15 April global day of action

On 16 September the Bakers union are holding a National Organising Day hosted by the Trade Union Congress.

The organising day is a space for fast food workers, union activists and community campaigners to find out more about the Fast Food Rights campaign.

It will be about drawing in activists from across the movement to discuss practical ways to help win better pay, job security and respect at work in fast food sector.

If you are a fast food worker, or are working in similar conditions–on low pay, without union rights, perhaps on a zero hours contract or with no contract at all–come along and join other workers in your position to learn more about how joining the union can tranform your life at work for the better.

It doesn’t matter if you have never been involved in anything like this before, or if you are not yet a member of a union–come along to find out more.

It is also about pulling together all those, whether based in fast food or not, who want to challenge poverty pay and zero hours contracts in Britain and see new areas organised by our unions.

When you work in fast food, you’re told that you have no control over your shifts, that you have to accept living on poverty pay, and that you can’t do anything about it.

Many feel they have no choice, that they have to put up with these conditions. But it’s not true.

On 15 April, Fast Food Rights had protests across Britain, for workers’ rights and fair pay. This was part of a global day of action involving fast food workers in 33 countries.

Fast food workers in America have now won a pay increase to $15 an hour and the right to join a union. Some of them will be at the National Organising Day telling their inspiring story of how they won change in the seemingly most unlikely circumstances.

The Fast food rights campaign here in Britain is fighting to do the same.

We are demanding these mega-profit companies pay a wage that workers can live on, provide the security of proper contracts with guaranteed hours and respect workers’ right to join a union.

WHEN AND WHERE?

10am – 6pm
@ the TUC, Great Russell Street,
London, WC1B 3LS,
(near Tottenham Court Road station)

 

HOW DO I GET THERE?

Transport is being organised from areas around the country, contact 07795 412 932 to get in touch with your local organiser. Transport costs can be covered as long as we know numbers coming.

 

AGENDA: 16 SEP
10:00 – 10:30: Arrival, meet & greet, tea & coffee

10:30 – 11:15: Welcome & introduction to the Fast Food Rights campaign:
Ian Hodson, Bakers’ union president & John McDonnell MP

11:15 – 12:15: Lessons from abroad: What’s been achieved in America & the success of Fight for $15:
American Fast Food workers who have led the strike movement+ Q&A
Plus video-link: Seattle City Councilmember & ‘$15 Now’ activist, Kshama Sawant

12:15 – 12:45: Where now for the UK campaign?
Fast food workers who have built the union in Glasgow, Julie Sherry, Fast Food Rights national coordinator & supporting campaigns + Q&A

12:45- 1:45–LUNCH (free)

1:45– 2:45: Lessons from other successful organising campaigns
Including strikers from Hovis Wigan, National Gallery strikers, Unite Hotel Workers branch activists & others

2:45–4:00 WORKSHOP: Organising in unorganised workplaces Carl Roper

4:00-5:00: Discussion & debrief. Write up next steps

THEN SOCIAL IN EVENING

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